April 21, 2017

Vigilant's very own completes the 2017 Boston Marathon

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Statistics show that 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by February, but that’s certainly not the case for Vigilant employee Eoin Craigie, who knocked one his 2017 resolutions off the list early! He runs competitively year round in all weather, from the frigid Montreal winters to the extreme heat of South Africa and the Florida Everglades. This past Monday, Craigie took to the streets of Boston, finishing one of the most famous marathons in the world. We sat down with him post-run to get the inside scoop:

When did you decide to run the Boston Marathon?

The Boston Marathon is like the Super Bowl of marathon racing. It’s a race I’ve wanted to run since I was young, just to say that I’ve run it. But to be honest, it’s not a spur of the moment decision. You can’t just decide to run the Boston Marathon, go to the website, sign-up and run the race. It’s a process.

First, you have to run a marathon on a Boston certified course and finish in a time that meets their age and gender requirements for entry. Then you have to apply online on their specific registration day (usually early September) to run the race the following year in April. They have a lot of strict rules and tough qualifying time requirements, but they want to make sure you put in the work to run this amazing race. You can get more details on what’s required on the Boston Athletic Association’s site. [http://www.baa.org/races/boston-marathon/participant-information/athlete-registration.aspx]

What was it like training for it? Where and how do you train?

Training for Boston is tough when you live in Montreal. The race is always in mid-April so training should start in January/February and it’s pretty ugly to run outside here in the freezing cold. You’re lucky if you get to run outside at all before the big day. Almost all my training was done on the treadmill at the gym to avoid running on the icy and snowy streets of Montreal. It can be tough to get excited about putting in sessions on the treadmill day after day but I try to focus on my ‘why’ and enjoy the process.

How did the Boston Marathon compare to other races you’ve done? What was the atmosphere like?

It truly was an incredible experience. The race starts in Hopkintin, MA and you run for 42.2km into the city center of Boston. streets are full of spectators the entire way cheering you on, giving high fives, and handing out water. They estimate more than 500,000 people are out watching the race.Their cheering keeps you going during the times you’re struggling. Words can’t describe how exhilarating it is.

Your time was ultra-impressive! How did you feel about it? Beat any personal bests?

Thanks for the kudos on my time! It wasn’t a personal best, but I am very proud considering I didn’t get to train much on the road and the day as very hot (mid 20 degrees C). My Montreal skin wasn’t used to all that sun.

What next for you? Any plans for future races?

My next major marathon will either be Montreal or Toronto…still deciding. Both are in the fall of this year and both are very different. Toronto is flat while Montreal is hilly. Both will be challenging in their own ways. I’ll be doing a few half marathons and shorter races during the summer to prepare for those races.

Anything else you’d like to add?

​I grew a mustache and long side burns for this race to honor my favorite runner Steve Prefontaine. He was a running legend from the U.S. but tragically died at the young age of 24.

To follow Eoin’s athletic journey, visit his Facebook Page here.

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